Review

We can’t think of a better show to highlight Detroit’s resurgence as Rock City! On April 8, 2017, icons of rock, Anthrax threw a party and all the cool kids were there to celebrate at the Fillmore Theater in Detroit. Joining Anthrax were Jasta, The Devil Wears Prada and Killswitch Engage. Each and every band stepped up and hit homers across the street all the way to the Detroit Tigers’ Comerica ballpark. 

The show opened early with Jasta. Jamie Jasta is best known as the lead vocalist of the metalcore band Hatebreed and sludge metal band Kingdom of Sorrow. Jasta also fronts metalcore band Icepick. As is that’s not enough to keep him busy, Jasta owns Stillborn Records, a hardcore and metal-based record label from West Haven, and “rock themed apparel” line called Hatewear.

In 2011, Jasta released a solo album entitled Jasta, collaborating with Randy Blythe and Mark Morton (Lamb of God), Zakk Wylde, Philip Labonte (All That Remains), and Tim Lambesis (As I Lay Dying). The performance at the Fillmore was with his self-titled band, Jasta. Crowd consensus was that Jasta nailed it and fired things up nicely. 

Batting next (to keep using my silly baseball analogy), was The Devil Wears Prada, an American metalcore band from Dayton, Ohio, formed in 2005. The band consists of members Mike Hranica (vocals, additional guitar), Jeremy DePoyster (rhythm guitar, vocals), Kyle Sipress (lead guitar, backing vocals), and Andy Trick (bass). To date, the group has released six full-length albums: Dear Love: A Beautiful Discord (2006), Plagues (2007), With Roots Above and Branches Below (2009), Dead Throne (2011), 8:18 (2013) and Transit Blues (2016) as well as two EPs, one DVD, sixteen singles, and thirteen music videos. If the show at the Fillmore was any indication, with over ten years and a gob o’ work in the can, The Devil Wears Prada isn’t slowing down anytime soon and has much more to rock. 

After The Devil Wears Prada, pitch hitting (I know), Killswitch Engage brought their signature manic enthusiasm. The crowd went nuts for this American metalcore band from Westfield, Massachusetts. Killswitch Engage’s current lineup consists of vocalist Jesse Leach, guitarists Joel Stroetzel and Adam Dutkiewicz, bassist Mike D’Antonio, and drummer Justin Foley. The band has released seven studio albums and one DVD. Their latest album, Incarnate, was released on March 11, 2016. At the Fillmore, Killswitch blasted out of the out of the bullpen (I can’t stop) with ‘Hate by Design’ and rounded out their highly energetic set with ‘Holy Diver’ and ‘In Due Time.’

Finally, clean up, Anthrax blew the crowd away with a blissfully long set covering many favorites from their discography. They included music from their most recent album, For All Kings and their extremely successful 2011 album, Worship Music.  Two of the standout songs during the Fillmore performance were ‘Evil Twin’ and ‘Monster at the End.’ The band also include classic crowd favorite like ‘Caught in a Mosh,’ ‘Efilnikufesin (N.F.L.),’ and ‘Indians.’

Formed in 1981 by guitarist Scott Ian and bassist Dan Lilker (who moved on within minutes to S.O.D., Nuclear Assault and Brutal Truth), this American thrash metal band from New York City has a lengthy iconic musical library to chose from. The group was considered one of the leaders of the thrash metal scene during the 1980s. Of the “Big Four” thrash metal bands (the others being Metallica, Megadeth and Slayer), Anthrax were the only band from the East Coast. As of April 2017, the band has released 11 studio albums, several other albums, and 26 singles, including collaborating on a single with American hip hop group Public Enemy. According to Nielsen SoundScan, Anthrax sold 2.5 million records in the United States from 1991 to 2004, with worldwide sales of 10 million. 

Exhausted after so much metal goodness, we felt lucky to see the Killthrax Tour in Detroit ROCK CITY! 

 

 



About the Author

Linda Gabriele
Linda Gabriele
Editor, legal advocate, photographer, playwright, actor, director, freelance writer, adjunct professor, blah, blah, blah . . .